About

A career break… Yes, that’s what I’ll call it!

I have always had wanderlust and this was possibly fueled by growing up in the multicultural surrounds of Melbourne. I would take a sandwich to school for lunch and trade it with my friends for spanakopita and baklava, amazed that a boring old sandwich could be traded for such exotic delights.

While studying at university, I took an internship in Tokyo and climbed Mt. Fuji for the first time. “A wise man climbs Mt. Fuji, a fool climbs it twice,” say the Japanese, but I am neither a man nor a fool and climbed to the top 7 times during the 7 years I lived there. From Tokyo to Toronto to London where I’m now based, I am searching for many of life’s answers, and hoping to find them along a trail… somewhere…

So far in my quest to find the answers I have walked and written a daily blog about the Camino Frances (2013), Coast to Coast (UK-2013), Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage (Japan-2013), Thames Path (UK-2013), Camino Portuguese (2014), Hadrian’s Wall (UK-2014), Cinque Terre (Italy-2014), Camino Primitivo (2014), Camino Ingles (2014) and the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada (2015).

*** If you’re planning on walking any of these trails, you’ll find heaps of handy info in the above links and if you have a question I haven’t answered, feel free to write a comment or send me an email.***

My ever-growing list of long-distance walks I’d love to do includes:

  • Via Francigena from Canterbury to Rome – UK to Italy

  • Via de la Plata – Spain

  • Oslo to Trondheim – Norway

  • GR20 – Corsica

  • Lycian Way – Turkey

  • Te Araroa – NZ

  • Bibbulman Track – Australia

  • Baekdudaegan Trail – South Korea

  • Kokoda Trail – PNG

  • heaps in Japan!

  • etc…

Let me know if you have a favourite walk I should attempt!

If you need some daily inspiration head over to my travel quotes page and feel free to add to the list🙂

Or if you want to sit back, relax and experience the PCT vicariously, then click here for my latest video.

Buen Camino, Happy Trails, Solvitur Ambulando!

Kat

Email: followingthearrows@hotmail.com

“A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step” – Lao-Tzu, Chinese Philosopher 604-531 BC

88 responses to “About

  1. Hi, just came across your blog and have enjoyed the snippets I’ve read thus far. Whilst you are much younger than us, you have already knocked off many walks on our bucket list. We kicked off our walking adventures only last year and also walked the Camino around the same time you did! Feel free to see our blog at http://jennyandstephen.com. I’ll continue to read all your past adventures and get some inspiration for the planning of our next adventure! BTW we are also Melbournians! Cheers Stephen

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    • Hi Stephen, thanks for your comment! I’m new to blogging so still trying to find my way around. Where will your next walk be? Hopefully mine will be the via de la plata but I can’t walk anywhere until I finish my blog! Let me know if you have any questions about any of the walks you’re hoping to do. Buen Camino!

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    • Thank you🙂 I walked along the cinque terre yesterday (stunning) and will write about it hopefully this week. Then next I think will be the Via de la Plata, it was recommended to me by a French man with limited English on the Portuguese camino (well I think he was recommending it??!), and I’ve just realised that a book I received for my birthday early this year but hadn’t got around to reading yet is by a retired Australian man who also walked the Via de la Plata… Where will your next walk be?

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      • I took the train along the Cinque Terre about fifteen years ago (before I had discovered the joys of walking). I am planning to walk the camino Mozarabe next year from Málaga, which is only 60 km from where I live, so I shall probably walk from home. The route joins the via de la plata at Merida, but it will be about 1500 km’s so I will most likely walk over two years. May see you en route?

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  2. Hi,again, Kat.
    I hiked the Cinque Terre 2 years ago, on my third visit there. I foolishly did it in my flip-flops, and had to dig out more than a few chestnut needles from my feet that night (after dinner and wine in Vernazza).
    ‘Hope you enjoyed Liguria as much as I did.

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  3. Just do it. Live your dream. Follow your arrows. Love the journey. Cherish the people you meet along the way. Each of them is an angel xxxx

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  4. Unfortunately, I am unable to “sponsee” you, but if you let me know when you are in Spain, I would gladly meet up with you again.

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  5. Have been reading your blog with great interest. My wife and I have also done the Camino, St Jean-Santiago , Wainwrights coast to coast which is morelike climbing across Britain rather than hiking, The Everglades, Hiking Alaska, the Great wall of China (not 12000 miles) and the Jesus trail in Israel.

    We are currently looking at walking the Portuguese Camino probably only from Oporto, and as we are now getting to the age we should slow down a bit,so the stages may well be a bit shorter
    . Did you do the coastal or the main route, and is the accomodation plentiful.

    Regards
    Neil
    ps. one of the good walks once taken was the 1000 steps just south of Melbourne in the Dandynongs if thats how you spell it. Dont make the mistake as I did however of having a big night out the evening before.

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    • Hi Neil,
      Thanks for your comments. I bet you’ve had some terrific adventures on those hikes! I dream of going to Alaska to see the bears catching the salmon, but I’m not sure I would survive hiking there!
      On the Portuguese camino from Oporto, I took the main route and this stretch of trail until Santiago had plenty of accommodation options every 20-25km or so. If you’ve not been to Portugal before I highly recommend a few places on the camino before Oporto: Lisbon, Coimbra and Tomar and if it could only be one of these places then definitely Tomar to visit the Knight’s Templar castle, it was simply stunning!
      Buen Camino!

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  6. Hi Kat, it looks realy great, you take so beautiful pictures🙂 that I feel like visiting all this places, I like them very much… thank you for your courage to do all this and share it with another🙂
    Buen camino! (wherever you are now:-))
    Joanna

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  7. Hiya firstly a very well done for all your achievement amazing, we have just completed the camino France from Sjdp to Santiago although we love walking it was our first long walk and like yourself we are addicted. We see that you have just completed the camino portugese , and that’s the one we would like to do nx any information you can give us would be really appreciated , eg like albergues is it as easy to follow the as the camino France (. You couldn’t really get lost there) amount of people who are on it type of walk flat ,hills, bit of both ect.
    Many thanks Jenny and Allan

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    • Hi Jenny & Allan,
      Thanks for your comment and well done on walking the Camino Frances🙂
      The Portuguese camino is not as “easy” as the Frances in terms of waymarking and albergues. In my experience, the arrows between Lisbon and Tomar were a little sketchy, but from Tomar onwards it was much easier to find my way. There is an organisation called Via Lusitana and I know they are working on making the waymarking better between this stretch, but I don’t know when this will be “complete.” Mario from the Santarem Hostel is also in the process of creating a pick-up and drop-off service between a few of the albergues to make the daily distances shorter – you can see the thread he started on the camino forum here
      There is also a link to a pdf document he made here
      I have detailed all the accommodation I stayed at (and prices) at the top of each day in my blog and have uploaded elevation graphs that will give you an idea how hilly it is – not really at all in the beginning and just a few towards the end.
      Johhnie Walker has a terrific blog with all the pilgrim statistics year-on-year, it’s worth a look to see the numbers of pigrims doing each camino.
      Let me know if you have any more questions🙂
      Kat

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  8. Brava! Did the 88-temple pilgrimage myself in 2009 (March 20~April 20)! Just on the eve of my 60th – after living in western Japan for some 16 years. Then returned to Australia (NSW). I wrote up my diary – calling it: “Angels of the way” (of course)!

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  9. Hello Kat,
    This is Jeff, you vendor machine beer buddy from Camino Frances. I just came across your most recent blog. I am so glad, and a lot jealous, that you are still walking. I was able to do a quick trek in Nepal on the Annapurna Circuit this past April, but I am planning an extended trip next June. Perhaps we will cross paths again. I will be checking in on your blog. Be safe.🙂

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    • Hi Zohar, thanks for your comment🙂 I’d never heard about this trail so thank you so much for telling me about it. Have you walked it? Thanks also for the link, I’ve got some reading to do🙂
      Cheers!
      Kat

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  10. Hi Kat,
    I did some stages.. no one is obliged to walk all of it. There are many other trails, for instance Jesus trail from Nazareth to Kafernahum (70 k)
    Read about it, and when you are here I’ll help you in my suroundings, near Cesarea (Kesaria, cesaria) were I live.
    zohar

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  11. Great blog. I have you bookmarked for all your useful info on the Shikoku hike. Can’t wait to do it next year.

    If you’re looking for something a little closer to home, have a look at Te Araroa. Did it a few tears ago and loved it.

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  12. Hi Kat ! I love your website. Great to read . There exists a long distance path here in the Netherlands, about 500 kms long from the northern Village Pieterburen to the utmost southern and beautiful town of Maastricht where it ends at the Sint Pietersberg (Saint Peters Mountain -with 300 mtrs the highest in the country. haha) it is called the “Pieterpad “. We walked half of it as a training for our first caminho and are intending to acomplish the second part either next year or the year after.

    Best regards from this side of the world
    Albertinho Rotterdam the Netherlands

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  13. Hi Kat

    Really like your website and enjoy reading about your walks. I too have the walking buzz (I guess there are worse things to be addicted to!) since hiking Machu Pichu a few years ago. Last year I walked Camino Frances and absolutely blew me away. Meeting people with such openness and honesty really opened my eyes. This year I walked the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon then followed the coast from Porto which was a much different experience. Very solitary but loved it all the same. Next year planning Via de la Plata, Camino Norte & perhaps the gr20 in Corsica along with cycling lands end to john o groates in UK. Plenty to keep me busy! Anyway im not sure if you know of the south west coast path in England? Its the longest waymarked route in Britain following 630 miles of coastline. I’ve walked parts of it and hope to do the whole lot staggered over various weeks and weekends next year too. Its tough, can be cold wet & windy but is stunning. More info here http://www.southwestcoastpath.com

    Good luck with all your journeys.
    Laurie

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    • Hi Laurie,
      Thanks for your comment, you definitely have the walking bug! I’m a bit envious as I would love to do all of the walks you’re planning to do next year!! Do you have a blog?

      I have heard about the south west coast (my in-laws live in Cornwall) and it certainly does look like a terrific and very scenic walk, but it’s the cost of walking in England (without a tent) that puts me off. Is it possible to camp along the trail?

      Buen Camino!

      Kat

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  14. Hello,
    This site is the first mention I have seen of a certificate for finishing the 88 Temples. Is it just a souvenir you bought, and the end?

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    • Hi Jake,
      I had never heard of the certificate either until I passed a place called the Henro Forum a few km before Temple 88. They gave me a free certificate in the Henro Forum (strange name but it’s a museum about the pilgrimage) and told me I could buy a more official certificate at Temple 88. I can’t remember how much it was but it’s a nice certificate, they write your name on it and it comes in a tube, handy for travelling. Are you planning to do the pilgrimage?
      Kat

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  15. Hi, i found your blog from your youtube channel after watching your Shikoku picture-video. Its on my to-do list. Congrats on finishing.

    I also walked camino frances this april and in july i walked half (1100km) of the Via Francigena. Both have changed my life, and i met an amazing “family” on the camino frances.

    Keep up the good work🙂

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    • Hi Tom,

      Thanks for dropping by. I would really love to walk the Via Francigena, did you write a blog? I know what you mean when you say life changing, walking the Camino Frances was the best thing I’ve ever done. Where will you be walking this year?
      Kat

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  16. The Camino is definitely on our life wish list!!🙂 Super interesting to see that you’ve got the Baekdudaegan Trail in South Korea on your list of long distance walks to conquer. It would be a challenging one for sure (trekking in Korea is tough, and usually requires a bit or climbing here and there), but communal spirit on trails is high. I’ve yet to go on a hike here, where someone hasn’t offered me food or drink.🙂

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    • Hi Shelley, thanks for your comment🙂 When I lived in Japan I visited Sth Korea a couple of times for hiking and mountain biking and loved it, especially Seoraksan (although my main memories there are the incredibly steep never-ending steps!) And just as you mentioned, I was always given food by other hikers I met!! Baekdudaegan is calling…

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  17. Hi Kat, first off a massive thank you for your blog, on both a practical and an inspirational level. I’m planning to walk the camino portuguese this september and reading your posts has really helped me. I’m giving myself a four-week window within which to do it, and I’m going to follow your advice and start in Tomar. I was just wondering whether I need to book accomodation in advance, or whether i can just take it on a day-by-day basis when i’m in the country.
    Thanks once again and all the best for your future walking adventures!
    Rupert

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    • Hi Rupert,
      Thanks for your comments, I’m glad my blog could help you in some way🙂
      If you wanted to start from Lisbon I know there’s now a pick-up & drop-off service for pilgrims to make the daily distances shorter. It was started by Mario who runs the Santarem hostel.
      I’m not sure how busy September will be but when I did it in June I called ahead to book accommodation about a day before (between Lisbon & Porto) but only because there weren’t many “albergues” in this stretch and I had to stay in pensions and public hostels. Some of the accommodations had strange opening hours so it was good to call ahead to find out. I think you will probably get a sense of how busy it is once you arrive (and if it’s not so busy) my only thought for calling ahead would be to find out what time they open.
      You’re going to have a wonderful time! Buen Camino!
      Kat

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  18. Hi, Kat thanks for your Blog,,,,very very interesting about Shikoku, I plant to go next Year, I have been in Giappon 25 years ago but for something else.
    This time I would like to go there to do this trip, could you give some Information?.
    What do you think how much money do I need?
    I intend to go from October to End of November,
    a
    And which airport its closer to Shikoku?
    I’m from Italy, but usually I’m fly from Munich ( germany).
    Many thanks…….
    Angelo….

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  19. Hi Kat, love your blog! My wife and I are deciding whether to walk the Camino Ingles or the Spanish portion of the Camino Portugues (Tui-SDC). Can you advise as to which route has less walking on busy or dangerous roadways? Beyond that, do you prefer one route over the other? If so, why? Thank you!

    Jeff

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    • Hi Jeff, there was only really one section of road that I remember on the Ingles and it wasn’t a busy road (after the hospital albergue – I can’t remember it’s name). The Ingles is nice and was very quiet when I did it last October but I would say the Portuguese from Tui to Santiago has more interesting towns to stay in and the terrain is more varied and not that much road walking that I can remember. I hope this helps! Buen Camino!

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  20. Hi Kat, Wow I love reading your blogs and enjoying the adventures you have had. I am heading of to Shikoku in late September to begin the 88 temple pilgrimage. I have a Garmin GPS and was wondering if you have any way points that I could use of the route? Do you have any advice for me?
    Many Thanks Jess xxxx

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    • Hi Jess, you’re going to have such an adventure!! I did make tracks on my Garmin but I’m currently hiking the PCT in America and don’t expect to get back home (and reunite with my Garmin) until Sept/Oct. The guy I went to Shikoku with bought an SD card for a GPS with the pilgrimage on it, I think it cost about $100 and he found it online. The path is pretty well waymarked and if you use the road maps from the guide you should be fine. I hope you have a terrific time!!!

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  21. Hi Kat
    Good to read your blog. Your love of adventure is inspiring and very similar to my wife’s and my own. We started around 2007 on our adventures (based from Melbourne). Since then we have been to Egypt, Morocco (Mt Toubkal), South Africa (environmental volunteering), UK, France (Loire Valley – Bike), Croatia (Istria – bikes), Tanzania (Kilimanjaro), NZ and OZ of course. The most memorable of our adventures to date though is the Camino Frances (STPDP to SDC) in 2009. It has become part of us and the saying Your Camino starts when you finish is so true. This year we are sailing as crew (never done this before) in Greece with some Australian friends (who do have some nautical experience)and planning for another bike ride throughout the UK (LEJOG) for next year. There is so much to do and we envy your youth (and time) as we approach our retirement in 2 years time. Our big plan for 2018 is to walk the Camino from Le Puy to SDC with no time restraints at all. Maybe that is the benefit of being older.
    Your blog is terrific and easy to navigate and we wish you luck with it in the future. Stay safe on your current walk.
    Buen Camino
    walkingtotheend.com
    (Ian)

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  22. Hi Kat

    Great adventures!

    I’ve done a few walks myself, including the Camino, and am in the process of collating cross-country walks on my new website http://www.walkacrossacountry.com with your permission I would like to put a link to your PCT blog once you finish. Might also give you a few more ideas! It seems the more you do the wish list gets longer eh…

    stay safe, hope the bugs aren’t biting too much!

    cheers
    Mark

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  23. Your PCT blogging is depressing to read after a long day at work!!! No interest in any of the aussie long distance trails currently on offer in the future like Heysen or Bibbulmun?

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    • Sorry about that!! If I ever move back to Oz I’ll probably hike some of the trails there but I’m currently living in the UK and have a huge list of walks around Europe that I want to do🙂

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  24. I kept your Accommodations page on Pocket and referred to it multiple times a day along with the Henro2009 one, and the Japanese ones I had. Firstly, thank you for that.

    And now I’m following your other trips to get tips on the next great places to go.😉 Thank you and keep it up!

    PS: We went in opposite directions! I went from Vancouver, to Toronto, to Hong Kong, to London, and have finally made it to Tokyo. I hope you continue to enjoy your career break.🙂

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  25. Congrats on finishing the PCT! I’m considering doing a thru-hike at some point and am asking around about a few things, I’d love your feedback! This probably is a silly concern compared to all of the other challenges you face, but what was your experience with critters like spiders and scorpions? I’m pretty terrified of scorpions and large spiders which I know live in the desert portion. My thought is that I’d be willing to face the fear if it is fairly uncommon to run into them, but if for instance run-ins with camel spiders or something similar are a daily occurrence in the desert then it’s probably not the trail for me. I would definitely take certain precautions such as not cowboy camping and keeping my pack in my tent. Anything you can share would be great!

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    • Hi Ellen, I had the same fears as you before I started. I’m terrified of spiders (probably why I left Australia!) and I said I would never ever cowboy camp in the desert but I actually ended up doing it quite a few times over the whole trip. I only saw spiders when hiking at night with a headlamp but I never night-hiked in the desert and don’t recall seeing any spiders or scorpions there. I initially always brought my shoes and pack in my tent with me but after Toulumne I swapped my tent and they no longer fit so they lived in my vestibule – every morning I would shake my shoes before putting them on and there was never anything inside them. I think I maybe saw 4 or 5 spiders over the entire 160 days, I definitely saw more rattle snakes! I wouldn’t say I’m over my fear of spiders but it wasn’t made any worse by being out there. I hope this helps🙂

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      • Thank you! That definitely puts my mind at ease! I’ve spent some time in the sierras so while i don’t love the spiders there I’m a little more comfortable with them. The desert was my main concern, but it sounds like if I don’t night hike it won’t be a huge issue.

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  26. Hi, came across your site while reading about the Camino Primitivo that I walked this summer.And has been following your ‘trail trials’ on the PCT, great reading.
    You’re list is probably even longer now, but given what I read here I can recommend the GR20 (Corsica) and the GR10 (across the Pyrenees) trails (you’ve probably heard of them). You can read about my ‘trail trials’ on those hikes on my blog: http://tarjeinskrede.blogspot.com.
    Love to see the Baekdudaegan on your list, I loved hiking it, though it was really hard. Recommended. Please read http://tarjeinskrede.blogspot.no/2015/06/baekdudaegan-useful-information.html for useful information of the trail (you find my account on the trail there as well). I did the Lycian Way this fall and it was nice, but not the best trail I’ve walked, I’m in the process of writing about it.

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    • Hi Tarjei,

      Thanks for your comment – I’ve just had a look at your blog and it’s very impressive! I look forward to reading all about your experiences on the GR20, Lycian Way, Baekdudaegan trail and more🙂

      What’s next for you?

      Kat

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      • Hi Tarjei,
        How funny, I have John’s book of the Gr1 on my desk, and if it wasn’t for an upcoming operation on my ankle, I’d probably be out there doing it… But it’s time for some recovery😦

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  27. Hi Kat,

    I’m so glad I came across your blog as I feel we have a lot in common – both Kats, from London, and both currently on a ‘career break’! You take beautiful photographs. My husband and I are planning on doing some travelling in the US and Central America this summer, and are considering doing a long section of the PCT as part of the trip. We love day hiking, but overnights and camping will be a whole new experience (one that scares the hell out of me, but I like a challenge)! I have been trying to decide on what would be the best section of the trail to hike if we start around 1st June, given scenery/ weather/ resupply points. Originally we were thinking of starting at the Oregon boarder and hiking north, so we could do a side-trip to Glacier afterwards, but now I’m beginning to wonder if completely missing California would be a mistake? Any advice you could provide would be awesome. All the best with your next adventure x

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    • Hi Kat🙂

      Your trip sounds awesome!

      This is a tricky question though… I think if I had to recommend some shorter stages along the PCT, they would be:

      California
      JMT part through the sierras, simply stunning! However, I’ve heard it’s quite hard to get the JMT permits and there might be a lot more snow this year than there was last year.
      From Echo Lake/South Lake Tahoe the trail is also really beautiful and if you had time to walk from here to Burney Falls / Mt Shasta or Ashland then you would really get a good sense of the trail.

      Oregon
      I was expecting lush green forest and waterfalls, but last year was very dry in Oregon and the moss had fallen off the trees and was dried out on the ground… however, I loved Oregon for the concentration of awesome towns/resupply points. Between Ashland and Cascade Locks you can stop at Hyatt Lake Resort, Fish Lake Resort, Crater Lake, Shelter Cove Resort, Elk Lake Resort, Bend, Sisters, Big Lake Youth Camp, Timberline Lodge… which makes resupplying very easy and your pack much lighter.

      Washington
      All of it. Love, love, loved it! But harder for resupply and a tough part of the trail if you’re not used to walking.

      Any questions, let me know🙂

      Happy Trails!
      Kat

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  28. I’ve just read your entire PCT Blog…thank you so much! I live 20 miles from Cascade Locks and 20 miles from Trout Lake (I’m in White Salmon, WA on the OR/WA border, across from Hood River, OR) so I’m a bit obsessed with the PCT right now. My husband was working on the fire near Mt Adams when you were walking the PCT. I love that we live so close and I can’t believe I didn’t get it for so long. I need to get out and check out some sections. Thank you for your blog. I am envious of your travels!

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  29. Enjoyed your Coast to Coast blog as background to trip we are planning this year (2016). Sorry to say though you were an American only to read here you are an Aussie too!. Of course I am a kiwi by birth and Aussie by choice but after 28 years here I still count. Surprised you do not have any NZ trails on your bucket list. We have done the Heaphy (4 days) and Stewart Island Northwest Circuit (we took 14 days over it) and can highly commend both for the get away from it all vibes. Fingers crossed we do not encounter any bees on our walk in July – or the biting flies…..

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    • Hi Dianne,

      You’re going to love the C2C and I really do hope you don’t encounter the biting flies either – although I only encountered them on a few days their bites and itchiness lasted a long time!

      I do actually have my eye on the Te Araroa in NZ and Bibbulman Track in Australia… I’m always embarrassed to say that I haven’t done any walks in either country, but I left Australia after Uni 15 years ago and have been living overseas ever since.

      But maybe this is the year🙂

      Good luck on the C2C!!

      Kat

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  30. Hi Kat,

    Just wondering what you did with your passport? Did you keep it on you or in the bounce box?

    We are heading off in April from Melbourne and just trying to work out if a bounce box/bucket is worth the effort. Thinking it will be good as there are 2 of us, and also to have Yogi’s sections, warmer clothes etc sent ahead if needed. Do you remember approx how much it was each time you sent it forward after opening it? I feel like here in Aus a bucket like yours would cost a lot to send.

    Thanks for the blog, its been incredibly helpful for the planning (as has bikehikesafari) especially as an Aussie. In regards to the above post you should add the AAWT to your list, beautiful hike🙂

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    • Hi Emma,

      I kept my passport with me in a waterproof ziplock – I never had a resupply box go missing but I personally wouldn’t want to take the chance of losing my passport that way. (And some bars wouldn’t serve alcohol without seeing my passport even though I had my drivers license with me.)

      I was always surprised at how cheap it was to sent the bucket, I think the first time I posted it, it was about $16 and I don’t remember it ever being more than $20 – the price was based on distance – and my box was crammed full to the top🙂

      I hiked with bikehikesafari (Shepherd) for a long time🙂

      Thks for the AAWT recommendation and Happy Trails!

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  31. Hi Kat! I just read your C2C blog and appreciate hearing about your trek. I’ll be starting at St. Bees with a “Camino” friend on May 2, 2016. I’m sure that your journeys have inspired many, like myself, to embark on new challenges. I was a skinny, non-athletic kid, but took up running 38 years ago. Now, I’m retired and at 69, able to run, well mostly, with the young and beautiful. I like being in the mountains and have done seven Colorado 14ers (14,000 ft. or 4,300 m). On one winter hike in the Rockies, I dug a snow cave where my neighbor and I slept at 25 F (-4 C) while outside it was -10 F (-23 C) the next morning.
    If you are looking for a new trek, check out the European Peace Walk (EPW) which originated in 2014, the one hundred year anniversary of the start of WW1. This year it starts in Sopron, Hungary (a short train from Vienna), then goes southeast through Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia and ends in Trieste, Italy. I can’t say it’s a favorite since I have not walked it, but I’m planning to in 2017.
    Joe

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    • Hi Joe,

      It sounds like you’ve had some pretty incredible adventures, congratulations on your 7 Colorado 14ers! I’d love to get to Colorado someday.

      I hope you enjoy the C2C, I thought it was stunning🙂

      I know someone who walked the EPW last year but I haven’t walked it myself… Yet😉

      Happy Trails!!

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  32. Hi Kat. I’m planning to hike the PCT next year and am a fellow Brit. I read the post about the visa but have a question about plane tickets….im planning on buying a one way ticket to San Diego. Then when I’m finished sorting out my ticket back to the UK. It’s possible that an injury, etc could mean I want to come back earlier so I don’t want to be tied to a return date/airport. Did you do this and if so did usa customs have a problem with you only having a one way ticket? Thanks

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    • Hi Pippa,
      I bought a return ticket (London – San Diego) as I had decided to take my backpack over in a suitcase (to protect my pack & hiking poles) and I arranged with Scout & Frodo to leave my suitcase with them and then picked it up to use for the return flight. I made sure my flight was a changeable ticket just in case I needed to come back earlier/later.
      I’m not sure what the rules are about buying a one-way ticket so the US consulate visa section would probably be worth contacting.
      Have fun with the planning🙂
      Kat

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    • I bought my ticket through BA and I think the change fee was around £50 (plus any differences in fare), but the change fee can vary quite a lot depending on the ticket so worth checking🙂

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  33. I so enjoyed your blog about the Primitivo…Your photos are wonderful and the info you provide is fantastic! I turn 70 next year and grew up in the flat lands of Indiana. However I have walked a few segments of the camino (French Way). And up hill seems to be impossible for me, consequently I walked alone (from eight friends) most of the time and didn’t mind one bit. I would breathlessly pause to allow the line of pilgrims which had piled up behind me at time, pass by and call out Buen Camino. But I was meant to be a down hill runner. : ) I now live in CT and have scoped out some challenging hills and routes to start practicing for my friend’s challenge starting at the last week of May into the first week of June next year. I probably will look at your photos and blog and elevations more than once as I start to train for the challenge of my lifetime. Had a horrific year this past 2015 and first 6 months of 2016…so much stress. My spirit is very willing and longing and I need to get in shape for the climbs! I have about 11 months…whether I get to go or not, local hiking will be good for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Karen,
      Thank you for your lovely comment. I’m in awe at your spirit and determination! Wishing you all the best with your training and I hope to bump into you on a trail one day xx

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  34. Hi Kat,
    Have just discovered your blog and I’m really impressed by your walking achievements as well as your commentary and your wonderful photos. Inspiring stuff. Congratulations.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Hi,
    I just stumbled on your temple hike and am working my way through it. I am 65yrs old but just did 1000 miles of the camino. I am contemplating getting on a plane at the end of Sept and doing the 88 temples. I like to walk in shorts, is that Ok at the temples. i also blog daily and i am wondering if internet is as accessible as on the camino.
    trying to keep the cost down but if too wet, camping wont be fun. I see the henro huts in other postings, i gather some are OK to sleep in.
    Anyway, thanks for you input and would love to hear back
    Pat holmes

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    • Hi Pat,
      Congrats on 1000 miles on the Camino, that’s a long way!!
      When I walked the Shikoku Pilgrimage I wore shorts too, but they were almost knee length. Although you won’t see many Japanese people wearing shorts, I think they’re fine as long as they’re not too short.
      Internet was definitely not as accessible on the Shikoku pilgrimage as it is on the Camino. Some convenience stores have wifi (so I would often sit outside using it while eating lunch), but there’s not many other places that do have it. (Not like on the camino where most bars/cafes/restaurants have it).
      Camping will definitely keep the cost down, or a combination of camping and staying in the huts and free accommodation – ask at Temple 1 for the list of free/cheap accom, I’ve uploaded the version on my blog that I was given in 2013, but it’s probably changed by now. The henro huts that I stayed in varied greatly but were fine as long as you had your own mat and sleeping bag.
      I hope you have a wonderful time in Shikoku and don’t hesitate to contact me if you need anything else.
      Kat

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  36. thanks again Kat, I seem to be getting this together and getting a better feel through your help. Its so apprectiated
    Pat

    Like

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